Summary of Study ST001439

This data is available at the NIH Common Fund's National Metabolomics Data Repository (NMDR) website, the Metabolomics Workbench, https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, where it has been assigned Project ID PR000989. The data can be accessed directly via it's Project DOI: 10.21228/M8VH7G This work is supported by NIH grant, U2C- DK119886.

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Study IDST001439
Study TitleMetabolites in contents of small intestine in wild type and DAOG181R/G181R mice
Study SummaryTo investigate if DAO regulates metabolites in intestinal lumen, we compared metabolites in contents of small intestine in wild type and DAOG181R/G181R mice. All mice have C57BL/6 background and 8 weeks of age.
Institute
Keio University
DepartmentPharmacology
Last NameSuzuki
First NameMasataka
Address35, Shinanomachi, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo
Emailmasataka.s@keio.jp
Phone+81-3-5363-3750
Submit Date2019-12-17
Analysis Type DetailMS
Release Date2020-08-04
Release Version1
Masataka Suzuki Masataka Suzuki
https://dx.doi.org/10.21228/M8VH7G
ftp://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/Studies/ application/zip

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Project:

Project ID:PR000989
Project DOI:doi: 10.21228/M8VH7G
Project Title:D-amino acids control IgA production
Project Summary:Intestinal microbiota produces D-amino acids, which are bacteria-specific metabolites, for their growth and their communication. Host intestine release D-amino acid oxidase (DAO) to degrade bacterial D-amino acids that results in regulation of microbiota. However, it is not clarified whether bacterial D-amino acids affect host’s immunity. In the present study, we investigated the metabolites in intestinal contents of DAO null mice compared to wild type animals. We did not find any significant difference in metabolites when we did not distinguish chirality. However, we found that DAO null mice had much higher amount of D-alanine in the intestinal epithelium, suggesting that D-alanine are involved in activated immune response in DAO null mice.
Institute:Keio University
Department:Pharmacology
Last Name:Suzuki
First Name:Masataka
Address:35, Shinanomachi,, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo, 160-8582, Japan
Email:masataka.s@keio.jp
Phone:+81-3-5363-3750
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