Summary of study ST001490

This data is available at the NIH Common Fund's National Metabolomics Data Repository (NMDR) website, the Metabolomics Workbench, https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, where it has been assigned Project ID PR001007. The data can be accessed directly via it's Project DOI: 10.21228/M8J106 This work is supported by NIH grant, U2C- DK119886.

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Study IDST001490
Study TitlePlasma lipidomic profiles after a low and high glycemic load dietary pattern in a randomized controlled cross over feeding study
Study SummaryBackground: Dietary patterns low in glycemic load are associated with reduced risk of cardiometabolic diseases. Improvements in serum lipid concentrations may play a role in these observed associations. Objective: We investigated how dietary patterns differing in glycemic load affect a clinical lipid panel and plasma lipidomics profiles. Methods: In a crossover, controlled feeding study, 80 healthy participants (n=40 men, n=40 women), 18-45 y were randomized to receive low-glycemic load (LGL) or high glycemic load (HGL) diets for 28 days each with at least a 28-day washout period between controlled diets. Fasting plasma samples were collected at baseline and end of each diet period. A clinical lipid panel including total-, VLDL-, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were measured using an auto-analyzer. Lipidomics analysis using mass-spectrometry provided the concentrations of 863 species. Linear mixed models were used to test for a diet effect. Results: Lipids from the clinical panel were not significantly different between diets. Lipidomics analysis showed that 67 lipid species, predominantly in the triacylglycerol class, differed between diets (FDR<0.05). A majority of these were higher after the LGL diet compared to the HGL. Conclusion: While the clinical lipid measures did not differ between diets, some lipid species were higher after the LGL diet in the lipidomics analysis. The two diets were eucaloric and had similar percentage of energy from carbohydrate, protein and fat. Thus, the difference in macronutrient, particularly carbohydrate, quality of the LGL diet is likely affecting the composition of lipid species.
Institute
Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Last NameDibay Moghadam
First NameSepideh
Address1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109
Emailsdibaymo@fredhutch.org
Phone206-667-4068
Submit Date2020-09-10
Raw Data AvailableYes
Analysis Type DetailLC-MS
Release Date2020-09-24
Release Version1
Sepideh Dibay Moghadam Sepideh Dibay Moghadam
https://dx.doi.org/10.21228/M8J106
ftp://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/Studies/ application/zip

Select appropriate tab below to view additional metadata details:


Project:

Project ID:PR001007
Project DOI:doi: 10.21228/M8J106
Project Title:Plasma lipidomic profiles after a low and high glycemic load dietary pattern in a randomized controlled cross over feeding study
Project Summary:Background: Dietary patterns low in glycemic load are associated with reduced risk of cardiometabolic diseases. Improvements in serum lipid concentrations may play a role in these observed associations. Objective: We investigated how dietary patterns differing in glycemic load affect a clinical lipid panel and plasma lipidomics profiles. Methods: In a crossover, controlled feeding study, 80 healthy participants (n=40 men, n=40 women), 18-45 y were randomized to receive low-glycemic load (LGL) or high glycemic load (HGL) diets for 28 days each with at least a 28-day washout period between controlled diets. Fasting plasma samples were collected at baseline and end of each diet period. A clinical lipid panel including total-, VLDL-, LDL-, and HDL-cholesterol and triglycerides were measured using an auto-analyzer. Lipidomics analysis using mass-spectrometry provided the concentrations of 863 species. Linear mixed models were used to test for a diet effect. Results: Lipids from the clinical panel were not significantly different between diets. Lipidomics analysis showed that 67 lipid species, predominantly in the triacylglycerol class, differed between diets (FDR<0.05). A majority of these were higher after the LGL diet compared to the HGL. Conclusion: While the clinical lipid measures did not differ between diets, some lipid species were higher after the LGL diet in the lipidomics analysis. The two diets were eucaloric and had similar percentage of energy from carbohydrate, protein and fat. Thus, the difference in macronutrient, particularly carbohydrate, quality of the LGL diet is likely affecting the composition of lipid species.
Institute:Fred Hutchinson Cancer Research Center
Last Name:Dibay Moghadam
First Name:Sepideh
Address:1100 Fairview Ave N, Seattle, WA 98109
Email:sdibaymo@fredhutch.org
Phone:206-667-4068

Subject:

Subject ID:SU001564
Subject Type:Human
Subject Species:Homo sapiens
Taxonomy ID:9606
Age Or Age Range:18-45
Gender:Male and female
Human Nutrition:Low glycemic load and high glycemic load diet
Human Inclusion Criteria:We recruited non-smoking, healthy individuals between the ages of 18-45 years from the Greater Seattle area.
Human Exclusion Criteria:Exclusion criteria consisted of impaired fasting glucose (fasting blood glucose ≥5.6 mmol/L), any physician-diagnosed condition requiring a restricted diet, food allergies, regular use of hormones or anti-inflammatory medication, current pregnancy or lactation or plans to become pregnant, or heavy use of alcohol (>2 drinks/d)

Factors:

Subject type: Human; Subject species: Homo sapiens (Factor headings shown in green)

mb_sample_id local_sample_id Treatment
SA12544813200563Baseline
SA12544913200662Baseline
SA12545013200944Baseline
SA12545113200399Baseline
SA12545213200696Baseline
SA12545313200597Baseline
SA12545413200712Baseline
SA12545513200688Baseline
SA12545613200449Baseline
SA12545713200647Baseline
SA12545813200787Baseline
SA12545913200720Baseline
SA12546013200613Baseline
SA12546113200803Baseline
SA12546213200746Baseline
SA12546313200035Baseline
SA12546413200761Baseline
SA12546513200738Baseline
SA12546613200811Baseline
SA12546713200357Baseline
SA12546813200852Baseline
SA12546913200753Baseline
SA12547013200837Baseline
SA12547113200795Baseline
SA12547213200621Baseline
SA12547313200456Baseline
SA12547413200589Baseline
SA12547513200829Baseline
SA12547613200571Baseline
SA12547713200522Baseline
SA12547813200282Baseline
SA12547913200498Baseline
SA12548013200365Baseline
SA12548113200241Baseline
SA12548213200480Baseline
SA12548313200373Baseline
SA12548413200530Baseline
SA12548513200266Baseline
SA12548613200126Baseline
SA12548713200134Baseline
SA12548813200233Baseline
SA12548913200118Baseline
SA12549013200472Baseline
SA12549113200308Baseline
SA12549213200290Baseline
SA12549313200431Baseline
SA12549413200407Baseline
SA12549513200324Baseline
SA12549613200639Baseline
SA12549713200894Baseline
SA12549813200514Baseline
SA12549913200381Baseline
SA12550013200258Baseline
SA12550113200340Baseline
SA12550213200274Baseline
SA12550313200555Baseline
SA12550413200332Baseline
SA12550513200217Baseline
SA12550613200605Baseline
SA12550713200670Baseline
SA12550813200928Baseline
SA12550913200969Baseline
SA12551013200704Baseline
SA12551113200076Baseline
SA12551213200019Baseline
SA12551313200027Baseline
SA12551413200910Baseline
SA12551513200084Baseline
SA12551613200936Baseline
SA12551713200845Baseline
SA12551813200043Baseline
SA12551913200951Baseline
SA12552013200068Baseline
SA12552113200886Baseline
SA12552213200548Baseline
SA12552313200902Baseline
SA12552413200464Baseline
SA12552513200050Baseline
SA12552613200977Baseline
SA12552713200423Baseline
SA12552813206172HGL
SA12552913202593HGL
SA12553013206230HGL
SA12553113206735HGL
SA12553213206628HGL
SA12553313202643HGL
SA12553413206362HGL
SA12553513202544HGL
SA12553613202346HGL
SA12553713206107HGL
SA12553813206412HGL
SA12553913206347HGL
SA12554013202221HGL
SA12554113202957HGL
SA12554213202775HGL
SA12554313206339HGL
SA12554413206909HGL
SA12554513206370HGL
SA12554613206727HGL
SA12554713206867HGL
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Collection:

Collection ID:CO001559
Collection Summary:We collected blood at baseline and the end of each 28-d dietary period after a minimum of a 12-h overnight fast. We used a standard protocol to process and store samples at -80°C until analysis. Homeostasis model assessment for insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which was used as a measure of insulin resistance for our post-hoc analysis, was calculated by dividing the product of fasting insulin and fasting glucose by a normalizing factor. Lipidomics Sample Preparation and Mass Spectrometry Frozen plasma samples were thawed at room temperature (25 °C) for 30 min, vortexed, and 25 µL plasma was transferred to a borosilicate glass culture tube (16 x 100 mm). Next, 0.475 mL water, 1.45 mL 1:0.45 methanol:dichloromethane, and 25 µL isotope-labeled internal standards mixture were added to the tube. The Lipidyzer isotope labeled internal standards mixture consisted of 54 isotopes from 13 lipid classes (Sciex, Framingham, MA). The mixture was vortexed for 5 sec and incubated at room temperature for 30 min. Next, another 0.5 mL water and 0.45 mL dichloromethane were added to the tube, followed by gentle vortexing for 5 sec, and centrifugation at 2500 g at 15 °C for 10 min. The bottom organic layer was transferred to a new tube and 0.9 mL of dichloromethane was added to the original tube for a second extraction. The combined extracts were concentrated under nitrogen and reconstituted in 0.25 mL of the mobile phase (10 mM ammonium acetate in 50:50 methanol:dichloromethane). Quantitative lipidomics was performed with the Sciex Lipidyzer platform consisting of Shimadzu Nexera X2 LC-30AD pumps, a Shimadzu Nexera X2 SIL-30AC autosampler, and a Sciex QTRAP® 5500 mass spectrometer equipped with SelexION® for differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). 1-propanol was used as the chemical modifier for the DMS. Samples were introduced to the mass spectrometer by flow injection at 8 µL/min. Each sample was injected twice, once with the DMS on [phosphatidylcholines (PC); phosphatidylethanolamines (PE); lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC); lysophosphatidylethanolamines (LPE); sphingomyelins (SM)], and once with the DMS off ([cholesterol esters (CE); ceramides (CER); diacylglycerols (DAG); dihydroceramides (DCER)/ free fatty acids(FFA); hexosylceramides (HCER); lactosylceramides (LCER); triacylglycerols (TAG)]. The lipid molecular species were measured using multiple reaction monitoring and positive/negative polarity switching. Positive ion mode detected lipid classes SM, DAG, CE, CER, DCER, HCER, DCER, and TAG, and negative ion mode detected lipid classes LPE, LPC, PC, PE, and FFA. A total of 1070 lipids and fatty acids were targeted in the analysis. Data was acquired and processed using Analyst 1.6.3 and Lipidomics Workflow Manager 1.0.5.0.
Sample Type:Blood (plasma)

Treatment:

Treatment ID:TR001579
Treatment Summary:A 7-day rotating menu was created for each diet. At baseline, participants completed a 3-d food record to estimate mean daily calorie intake. Energy intake from the food records along with weight, height, sex and activity level were used to estimate each participant’s daily energy needs necessary to maintain the current weight. The estimated calorie intake was used to adjust the 7-day rotating menu to meet each participant’s needs so that they would remain weight stable during the study. The percentage energy from macronutrients of the two diets were identical: 15% energy from protein, 30% energy from fat, and 55% energy from carbohydrate. The LGL diet provided on average 55 g/d of fiber and 77 g/d of fructose, with a GL of 125 (Table 1). The HGL diet substituted refined grains for whole grains, included other carbohydrates from high-glycemic index food sources and provided on average 28 g/d of fiber and 26 g/d of fructose, with a GL of 250. All food was prepared and provided by the Fred Hutch Human Nutrition Laboratory (HNL) during the intervention. Weekday dinners were consumed under supervision at the HNL, and the next day’s breakfast, lunch and snacks were portioned, packaged and taken home for consumption. Examples of study menus and detail on diet consumption have been published previously (Neuhouser et al. 2012).

Sample Preparation:

Sampleprep ID:SP001572
Sampleprep Summary:Lipidomics Sample Preparation and Mass Spectrometry Frozen plasma samples were thawed at room temperature (25 °C) for 30 min, vortexed, and 25 µL plasma was transferred to a borosilicate glass culture tube (16 x 100 mm). Next, 0.475 mL water, 1.45 mL 1:0.45 methanol:dichloromethane, and 25 µL isotope-labeled internal standards mixture were added to the tube. The Lipidyzer isotope labeled internal standards mixture consisted of 54 isotopes from 13 lipid classes (Sciex, Framingham, MA). The mixture was vortexed for 5 sec and incubated at room temperature for 30 min. Next, another 0.5 mL water and 0.45 mL dichloromethane were added to the tube, followed by gentle vortexing for 5 sec, and centrifugation at 2500 g at 15 °C for 10 min. The bottom organic layer was transferred to a new tube and 0.9 mL of dichloromethane was added to the original tube for a second extraction. The combined extracts were concentrated under nitrogen and reconstituted in 0.25 mL of the mobile phase (10 mM ammonium acetate in 50:50 methanol:dichloromethane). Quantitative lipidomics was performed with the Sciex Lipidyzer platform consisting of Shimadzu Nexera X2 LC-30AD pumps, a Shimadzu Nexera X2 SIL-30AC autosampler, and a Sciex QTRAP® 5500 mass spectrometer equipped with SelexION® for differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). 1-propanol was used as the chemical modifier for the DMS. Samples were introduced to the mass spectrometer by flow injection at 8 µL/min. Each sample was injected twice, once with the DMS on [phosphatidylcholines (PC); phosphatidylethanolamines (PE); lysophosphatidylcholines (LPC); lysophosphatidylethanolamines (LPE); sphingomyelins (SM)], and once with the DMS off ([cholesterol esters (CE); ceramides (CER); diacylglycerols (DAG); dihydroceramides (DCER)/ free fatty acids(FFA); hexosylceramides (HCER); lactosylceramides (LCER); triacylglycerols (TAG)]. The lipid molecular species were measured using multiple reaction monitoring and positive/negative polarity switching. Positive ion mode detected lipid classes SM, DAG, CE, CER, DCER, HCER, DCER, and TAG, and negative ion mode detected lipid classes LPE, LPC, PC, PE, and FFA. A total of 1070 lipids and fatty acids were targeted in the analysis. Data was acquired and processed using Analyst 1.6.3 and Lipidomics Workflow Manager 1.0.5.0.

Combined analysis:

Analysis ID AN002468 AN002469
Analysis type MS MS
Chromatography type None (Direct infusion) None (Direct infusion)
Chromatography system Triple quadrupole Triple quadrupole
Column ESI ESI
MS Type ESI ESI
MS instrument type Triple quadrupole Triple quadrupole
MS instrument name ABI Sciex 5500 QTrap ABI Sciex 5500 QTrap
Ion Mode UNSPECIFIED UNSPECIFIED
Units mM mM

Chromatography:

Chromatography ID:CH001809
Chromatography Summary:Quantitative lipidomics was performed with the Sciex Lipidyzer platform consisting of Shimadzu Nexera X2 LC-30AD pumps, a Shimadzu Nexera X2 SIL-30AC autosampler, and a Sciex QTRAP® 5500 mass spectrometer equipped with SelexION® for differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). 1-propanol was used as the chemical modifier for the DMS. Samples were introduced to the mass spectrometer by flow injection analysis at 8 uL/min aka direct infusion. Each sample was injected twice, once with the DMS on Method 1 (PC/PE/LPC/LPE/SM), and once with the DMS off Method 2 (CE/CER/DAG/DCER/FFA/HCER/LCER/TAG). The lipid molecular species were measured using multiple reaction monitoring (MRM) and positive/negative polarity switching. Positive ion mode detected lipid classes SM/DAG/CE/CER/DCER/HCER/LCER/TAG and negative ion mode detected lipid classes LPE/LPC/PC/PE/FFA. A total of 1070 lipids and fatty acids were targeted in the analysis.
Instrument Name:Triple quadrupole
Column Name:ESI
Chromatography Type:None (Direct infusion)

MS:

MS ID:MS002288
Analysis ID:AN002468
Instrument Name:ABI Sciex 5500 QTrap
Instrument Type:Triple quadrupole
MS Type:ESI
MS Comments:Quantitative lipidomics was performed with the Sciex Lipidyzer platform consisting of Shimadzu Nexera X2 LC-30AD pumps, a Shimadzu Nexera X2 SIL-30AC autosampler, and a Sciex QTRAP® 5500 mass spectrometer equipped with SelexION® for differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). 1-propanol was used as the chemical modifier for the DMS. Samples were introduced to the mass spectrometer by flow injection analysis at 8 uL/min aka direct infusion. Each sample was injected twice, once with the DMS on Method 1 (PC/PE/LPC/LPE/SM)
Ion Mode:UNSPECIFIED
  
MS ID:MS002289
Analysis ID:AN002469
Instrument Name:ABI Sciex 5500 QTrap
Instrument Type:Triple quadrupole
MS Type:ESI
MS Comments:Quantitative lipidomics was performed with the Sciex Lipidyzer platform consisting of Shimadzu Nexera X2 LC-30AD pumps, a Shimadzu Nexera X2 SIL-30AC autosampler, and a Sciex QTRAP® 5500 mass spectrometer equipped with SelexION® for differential mobility spectrometry (DMS). 1-propanol was used as the chemical modifier for the DMS. Samples were introduced to the mass spectrometer by flow injection analysis at 8 uL/min aka direct infusion. Each sample was injected twice once with the DMS off Method 2 (CE/CER/DAG/DCER/FFA/HCER/LCER/TAG)
Ion Mode:UNSPECIFIED
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