Summary of study ST001809

This data is available at the NIH Common Fund's National Metabolomics Data Repository (NMDR) website, the Metabolomics Workbench, https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, where it has been assigned Project ID PR001143. The data can be accessed directly via it's Project DOI: 10.21228/M8ZH7D This work is supported by NIH grant, U2C- DK119886.

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This study contains a large results data set and is not available in the mwTab file. It is only available for download via FTP as data file(s) here.

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Study IDST001809
Study TitleThe Metabolic Benefits of Short Cycles of Very Low Caloric Intake are Dependent on Diet Composition in Middle-Aged Mice
Study SummaryDiet composition, calories, and fasting times contribute to maintenance of health. Here, middle-aged mice were maintained for 5 months on 4:10 feeding cycles, consisting of 4 days of very low-calorie intake (VLCI) achieved with either standard laboratory chow (SD) or a fasting mimicking diet (FMD), followed by 10 days of ad libitum access to SD. Fat and lean mass loss was accompanied with improved performance, glucoregulation, and metabolic flexibility independent of diet composition. However, only the 4:10/SD cycles elicited a long-lasting metabolomic reprograming in serum and liver that was preserved six days after refeeding. Challenged with an obesogenic diet, cycles of VLCI achieved with either high-fat diet (HFD) or FMD during the low-calorie period did not prevent diet-induced obesity nor did they elicited a long-lasting metabolic memory, despite achieving modest metabolic flexibility. Our results highlight the importance of diet composition in mediating the metabolic benefits of short cycles of VLCI.
Institute
National Institutes of Health
DepartmentExperimental Gerontology Section and Translational Gerontology Branch, NIA
Last Namede Cabo
First NameRafael
Address251 Bayview Blvd. Suite 100/Room 5C214. Baltimore, MD 21224
EmaildeCaboRa@grc.nia.nih.gov
Phone+1-410-558-8510
Submit Date2021-05-27
Raw Data AvailableYes
Raw Data File Type(s).cdf
Analysis Type DetailGC-MS
Release Date2021-09-15
Release Version1
Rafael de Cabo Rafael de Cabo
https://dx.doi.org/10.21228/M8ZH7D
ftp://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/Studies/ application/zip

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Project:

Project ID:PR001143
Project DOI:doi: 10.21228/M8ZH7D
Project Title:The Metabolic Benefits of Short Cycles of Very Low Caloric Intake are Dependent on Diet Composition in Middle-Aged Mice
Project Summary:Diet composition, calories, and fasting times contribute to maintenance of health. Here, middle-aged mice were maintained for 5 months on 4:10 feeding cycles, consisting of 4 days of very low-calorie intake (VLCI) achieved with either standard laboratory chow (SD) or a fasting mimicking diet (FMD), followed by 10 days of ad libitum access to SD. Fat and lean mass loss was accompanied with improved performance, glucoregulation, and metabolic flexibility independent of diet composition. However, only the 4:10/SD cycles elicited a long-lasting metabolomic reprograming in serum and liver that was preserved six days after refeeding. Challenged with an obesogenic diet, cycles of VLCI achieved with either high-fat diet (HFD) or FMD during the low-calorie period did not prevent diet-induced obesity nor did they elicited a long-lasting metabolic memory, despite achieving modest metabolic flexibility. Our results highlight the importance of diet composition in mediating the metabolic benefits of short cycles of VLCI.
Institute:National Institutes of Health
Department:Experimental Gerontology Section and Translational Gerontology Branch, NIA
Last Name:de Cabo
First Name:Rafael
Address:251 Bayview Blvd. Suite 100/Room 5C214. Baltimore, MD 21224
Email:deCaboRa@grc.nia.nih.gov
Phone:+1-410-558-8510
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