Summary of study ST000107

This data is available at the NIH Common Fund's National Metabolomics Data Repository (NMDR) website, the Metabolomics Workbench, https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, where it has been assigned Project ID PR000046. The data can be accessed directly via it's Project DOI: 10.21228/M84S36 This work is supported by NIH grant, U2C- DK119886.

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Study IDST000107
Study TitleMetabolomic and lipidomic profiles in response to exogenous insulin and GLP-1 infusions during prolonged fasting
Study TypeTimecourse
Study SummarySeventeen northern elephant seal pups constituting four different cohorts at Año Nuevo State Reserve were studied at two post-weaning periods: early (1-2 wk post weaning; n=5) and late (6-7 weeks post weaning; n=12). Study #1: Prior to each infusion protocol, plasma U/kg). Following the infusion, blood samples were collected at 10,To determine the effects of prolonged fasting on peripheral insulin activity and function, samples were collected. Ten fasting seal pups (n=5 early, n=5 late) were infused (i.v.) with a mass-specific dose of insulin (0.065 U/kg). Following the infusion, blood samples were collected at 10, 30, 60, 90, and 120 minutes. Study #2: Seven, late-fasted seal pups were administered either a low (LDG; 10 pmol/kg; n=3) or high (HDG; 100 pmol/kg; n=4) dose of GLP-1 immediately following a glucose bolus (0.5 g/kg) (i.v.) infused within 2 mins. the infusions, blood samples were collected at 10, 30, 60, 90, 120, and 150 minutes.
Institute
University of California, Davis
DepartmentNutrition
LaboratoryNewman
Last NameNewman
First NameJohn
Address430 W. Health Sciences Dr., Davis, CA 95616
Emailjohn.newman@ars.usda.gov
Phone+1-530-752-1009
Submit Date2014-07-10
Num Groups4
Total Subjects5
Raw Data AvailableYes
Raw Data File Type(s)mzML, .MS, .txt, INI
Uploaded File Size751 M
Analysis Type DetailGC/LC-MS
Release Date2015-02-03
Release Version1
John Newman John Newman
https://dx.doi.org/10.21228/M84S36
ftp://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/Studies/ application/zip

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Project:

Project ID:PR000046
Project DOI:doi: 10.21228/M84S36
Project Title:Metabolomic & lipidomic profiles in response to exogenous insulin & GLP-1 infusions during prolonged fasting
Project Type:Timecourse
Project Summary:This application requests funding to access state-of-the-art metabolomics and lipidomic platforms at the NIH West Coast Metabolomics Center to analyze plasma samples from recent insulin and glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) infusion experiments performed in prolong-fasted elephant seals. This suite of studies was designed to better assess the mechanisms contributing to the onset of an insulin resistantlike condition induced by prolonged food deprivation/starvation in mammals. Because elephant seals have evolved robust physiological mechanisms that have allowed them to naturally tolerate such protracted bouts of fasting, they provide an ideal model to address our central hypothesis that increased lipid utilization late in the fast contributes to insulin resistance in elephant seals. Insulin resistance is a common consequence of fasting in mammals and, while the mechanisms by which it manifests are still unclear, a metabolic shift favoring increased mobilization and utilization of lipids during prolonged food deprivation may be a principal causative factor. Insulin resistance has a negative connotation due to its association with obesity and diabetes among humans, but it has been suggested to be an adaptive response to food deprivation.
Institute:University of California, Merced
Department:School of Natural Sciences
Laboratory:Molecular and Cellular Biology, Natural Sciences
Last Name:Ortiz
First Name:Rudy
Address:5200 N. Lake Rd.; Merced, CA 95343
Email:rortiz@ucmerced.edu
Phone:209.228.2964
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