Summary of study ST000240

This data is available at the NIH Common Fund's National Metabolomics Data Repository (NMDR) website, the Metabolomics Workbench, https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, where it has been assigned Project ID PR000193. The data can be accessed directly via it's Project DOI: 10.21228/M8FK5P This work is supported by NIH grant, U2C- DK119886.

See: https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/about/howtocite.php

This study contains a large results data set and is not available in the mwTab file. It is only available for download via FTP as data file(s) here.

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Study IDST000240
Study TitleGlobal LC-MS of Ozone Stress in Maize: GLCMS
Study Typeozone treatment
Study SummaryGlobal LC-MS of maize leaf samples collected from plants grown at ambient and elevated ozone concentrations in replicated field experiment
Institute
University of Florida
DepartmentSoutheastern Center for Integrated Metabolomics (SECIM)
Last NameAinsworth
First NameElizabeth
Emailainswort@illinois.edu
Submit Date2015-02-24
Num Groups2
Total Subjects24
Raw Data AvailableYes
Raw Data File Type(s).mzXML
Analysis Type DetailLC-MS
Release Date2016-09-23
Release Version1
Elizabeth Ainsworth Elizabeth Ainsworth
https://dx.doi.org/10.21228/M8FK5P
ftp://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/Studies/ application/zip

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Project:

Project ID:PR000193
Project DOI:doi: 10.21228/M8FK5P
Project Title:Global LC-MS of Ozone Stress in Maize: GLCMS
Project Summary:Oxidative stress arising from O3 exposure is reducing potential maize yields by up to 10%. Yield losses to O3 are projected to as much as double by mid-century, and there is thought to be little potential for adaptation to rising O3 concentrations ([O3]) through altered crop management practices. Therefore, the only solution to current and future O3-induced yield loss is development of O3 tolerant maize through breeding and/or biotechnology. In this project, we will investigate the metabolite profiles that underpin O3 sensitivity in maize.
Institute:University of Illinois Urbana-Champaign
Department:Plant Biology
Last Name:Ainsworth
First Name:Elizabeth
Address:1201 W. Gregory Dr., Urbana, IL 61801
Email:ainswort@illinois.edu
Phone:(217) 265-9887
Funding Source:Southeastern Center for Integrated Metabolomics (SECIM) pilot and feasibility funding, NIH U24 DK097209
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