Summary of study ST000392

This data is available at the NIH Common Fund's National Metabolomics Data Repository (NMDR) website, the Metabolomics Workbench, https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, where it has been assigned Project ID PR000306. The data can be accessed directly via it's Project DOI: 10.21228/M8T60D This work is supported by NIH grant, U2C- DK119886.

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Study IDST000392
Study TitleSystemic Metabolomic Changes in Blood Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Identified by Gas Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry
Study SummaryLung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Metabolic alterations in tumor cells coupled with systemic indicators of the host response to tumor development have the potential to yield blood profiles with clinical utility for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. We report results from two separate studies using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) to profile metabolites in human blood samples that significantly differ from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) adenocarcinoma and other lung cancer cases. Metabolomic analysis of blood samples from the two studies yielded a total of 437 metabolites, of which 148 were identified as known compounds and 289 identified as unknown compounds. Differential analysis identified 15 known metabolites in one study and 18 in a second study that were statistically different (p-values <0.05). Levels of maltose, palmitic acid, glycerol, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, and lactic acid were increased in cancer samples while amino acids tryptophan, lysine and histidine decreased. Many of the metabolites were found to be significantly different in both studies, suggesting that metabolomics appears to be robust enough to find systemic changes from lung cancer, thus showing the potential of this type of analysis for lung cancer detection.
Institute
University of California, Davis
DepartmentGenome and Biomedical Sciences Facility
LaboratoryWCMC Metabolomics Core
Last NameFiehn
First NameOliver
Address1315 Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616
Emailofiehn@ucdavis.edu
Phone(530) 754-8258
Submit Date2016-05-09
Total Subjects82
Num Males20
Num Females62
Study CommentsSS = Sigma sample and is used as a quality control
Publicationsdoi: 10.3390/metabo5020192
Raw Data AvailableYes
Raw Data File Type(s).peg
Analysis Type DetailGC-MS
Release Date2016-06-18
Release Version2
Release CommentsUpdated study design factors
Oliver Fiehn Oliver Fiehn
https://dx.doi.org/10.21228/M8T60D
ftp://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/Studies/ application/zip

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Project:

Project ID:PR000306
Project DOI:doi: 10.21228/M8T60D
Project Title:Systemic Metabolomic Changes in Blood Samples of Lung Cancer Patients Identified by Gas Chromatography Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry
Project Summary:Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer deaths worldwide. Metabolic alterations in tumor cells coupled with systemic indicators of the host response to tumor development have the potential to yield blood profiles with clinical utility for diagnosis and monitoring of treatment. We report results from two separate studies using gas chromatography time-of-flight mass spectrometry (GC-TOF MS) to profile metabolites in human blood samples that significantly differ from non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) adenocarcinoma and other lung cancer cases. Metabolomic analysis of blood samples from the two studies yielded a total of 437 metabolites, of which 148 were identified as known compounds and 289 identified as unknown compounds. Differential analysis identified 15 known metabolites in one study and 18 in a second study that were statistically different (p-values <0.05). Levels of maltose, palmitic acid, glycerol, ethanolamine, glutamic acid, and lactic acid were increased in cancer samples while amino acids tryptophan, lysine and histidine decreased. Many of the metabolites were found to be significantly different in both studies, suggesting that metabolomics appears to be robust enough to find systemic changes from lung cancer, thus showing the potential of this type of analysis for lung cancer detection.
Institute:University of California, Davis
Department:Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility
Laboratory:WCMC Metabolomics Core
Last Name:Fiehn
First Name:Oliver
Address:1315 Genome and Biomedical Sciences Facility, 451 Health Sciences Drive, Davis, CA 95616
Email:ofiehn@ucdavis.edu
Phone:(530) 754-8258
Funding Source:NIH U24DK097154
Publications:doi: 10.3390/metabo5020192
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