Summary of study ST001372

This data is available at the NIH Common Fund's National Metabolomics Data Repository (NMDR) website, the Metabolomics Workbench, https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, where it has been assigned Project ID PR000938. The data can be accessed directly via it's Project DOI: 10.21228/M8FM4N This work is supported by NIH grant, U2C- DK119886.

See: https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/about/howtocite.php

This study contains a large results data set and is not available in the mwTab file. It is only available for download via FTP as data file(s) here.

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Study IDST001372
Study TitlePatterns in metabolite pools show that phytoplankton leave a taxon-specific signature on particulate carbon: North Pacific Subtropical Gyre depth profile
Study TypeMarine metabolomics depth profile
Study SummaryIn the surface ocean, carbon is fixed by phytoplankton and respired by the entire marine community at an astonishingly high rate. At any point in time, the difference between these two processes yields a carbon pool in surface particles that is a combination of both freshly fixed and partially degraded material. On a molecular level, we have a limited knowledge of the small molecules, or metabolites, within this pool. Specific metabolites have been shown to be responsible for fueling respiration, maintaining organismal interactions, and transferring energy throughout the microbial community. Metabolomics, or the direct observation and quantification of the small molecules that are the result of cellular activity, provides an important lens through which we can begin to assess the standing stocks of small compounds that likely fuel a great deal of heterotrophic activity in the surface ocean. Here we describe community metabolomes of particulate material into the North Pacific Ocean and compare the metabolomes to a variety of phytoplankton grown in the lab. Using both targeted and untargeted metabolomics, we identify metabolites in the particulate carbon pool and explore their latitudinal and phylogenetic distributions. This analysis reveals several compounds that have not been previously recognized as abundant components of the marine organic carbon pool. We found that the community metabolome showed distinct differences between the regimes that likely reflects the phytoplankton community present. The community metabolome in surface waters of the subtropical domain was remarkably consistent even when sampled weeks apart, while the northern regions showed a patichier and less reproducible community metabolome. Some individual compounds showed distinct patterns between oceanographic regimes, including homarine, an abundant molecule that can contribute up to 4\% of the total particulate carbon pool in marine surface waters. Glutamic acid and glutamine showed opposite patterns in the oceanographic regimes, suggesting differences in community-level nitrogen assimilation in these different regimes. Overall, this study offers a new perspective into particulate carbon composition in oceanographic research, reveals important carbon pools that may fuel the microbial loop, and suggests an altered community-level nitrogen assimilation capacity over the North Pacific transition zone.
Institute
University of Washington
DepartmentSchool of Oceanography
LaboratoryIngalls Lab
Last NameHeal
First NameKatherine
Address1501 NE Boat Street, Marine Science Building, Room G
Emailkheal@uw.edu
Phone612-616-4840
Submit Date2020-04-28
Raw Data AvailableYes
Raw Data File Type(s).mzXML
Analysis Type DetailLC-MS
Release Date2020-10-28
Release Version1
Katherine Heal Katherine Heal
https://dx.doi.org/10.21228/M8FM4N
ftp://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/Studies/ application/zip

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Project:

Project ID:PR000938
Project DOI:doi: 10.21228/M8FM4N
Project Title:Patterns in metabolite pools show that phytoplankton leave a taxon-specific signature on particulate carbon: North Pacific Subtropical Gyre depth profile
Project Type:Marine Metabolomics
Project Summary:In the surface ocean, carbon is fixed by phytoplankton and respired by the entire marine community at an astonishingly high rate. At any point in time, the difference between these two processes yields a carbon pool in surface particles that is a combination of both freshly fixed and partially degraded material. On a molecular level, we have a limited knowledge of the small molecules, or metabolites, within this pool. Specific metabolites have been shown to be responsible for fueling respiration, maintaining organismal interactions, and transferring energy throughout the microbial community. Metabolomics, or the direct observation and quantification of the small molecules that are the result of cellular activity, provides an important lens through which we can begin to assess the standing stocks of small compounds that likely fuel a great deal of heterotrophic activity in the surface ocean. Here we describe community metabolomes of particulate material into the North Pacific Ocean and compare the metabolomes to a variety of phytoplankton grown in the lab. Using both targeted and untargeted metabolomics, we identify metabolites in the particulate carbon pool and explore their latitudinal and phylogenetic distributions. This analysis reveals several compounds that have not been previously recognized as abundant components of the marine organic carbon pool. We found that the community metabolome showed distinct differences between the regimes that likely reflects the phytoplankton community present. The community metabolome in surface waters of the subtropical domain was remarkably consistent even when sampled weeks apart, while the northern regions showed a patchier and less reproducible community metabolome. Some individual compounds showed distinct patterns between oceanographic regimes, including homarine, an abundant molecule that can contribute up to 4% of the total particulate carbon pool in marine surface waters. Glutamic acid and glutamine showed opposite patterns in the oceanographic regimes, suggesting differences in community-level nitrogen assimilation in these different regimes. Overall, this study offers a new perspective into particulate carbon composition in oceanographic research, reveals important carbon pools that may fuel the microbial loop, and suggests an altered community-level nitrogen assimilation capacity over the North Pacific transition zone.
Institute:University of Washington
Department:School of Oceanography
Laboratory:Ingalls Lab
Last Name:Heal
First Name:Katherine
Address:1501 NE Boat Street, Marine Science Building, Room G, Seattle, WA, 98195, USA
Email:kheal@uw.edu
Phone:612-616-4840
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