Summary of study ST001526

This data is available at the NIH Common Fund's National Metabolomics Data Repository (NMDR) website, the Metabolomics Workbench, https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, where it has been assigned Project ID PR001027. The data can be accessed directly via it's Project DOI: 10.21228/M8Z41B This work is supported by NIH grant, U2C- DK119886.

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Study IDST001526
Study TitleMitochondrial health is enhanced in rats with higher vs. lower intrinsic exercise capacity and extended lifespan
Study SummaryThe intrinsic aerobic capacity of an organism is thought to play a role in aging and longevity. Maximal respiratory rate capacity, a metabolic performance measure, is one of the best predictors of cardiovascular- and all-cause mortality. Rats selectively bred for high-(HCR) vs. low-(LCR) intrinsic running-endurance capacity have up to 31% longer lifespan. We found that positive changes in indices of mitochondrial health in cardiomyocytes (respiratory reserve, maximal respiratory capacity, resistance to mitochondrial permeability transition, autophagy/mitophagy, higher lipids-over-glucose utilization) are uniformly associated with the extended longevity in HCR vs. LCR female rats. Cross-sectional heart metabolomics revealed pathways from lipid metabolism in the heart which were significantly enriched by a select group of strain dependent metabolites, consistent with enhanced lipids utilization by HCR cardiomyocytes. Heart-liver-serum metabolomics further revealed shunting of lipidic substrates between liver and heart via serum during aging. Thus, mitochondrial health in cardiomyocytes is associated with extended longevity in rats with higher intrinsic exercise capacity, and likely these findings can be translated to other populations as predictors of outcomes of health and survival.
Institute
National Institute on Aging
DepartmentCardioprotection Section
LaboratoryLaboratory of Cardiovascular Science
Last NameSollott
First NameSteven
AddressLaboratory of Cardiovascular Science, National Institute on Aging, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
Emailsollotts@grc.nia.nih.gov
Phone410-558-8657
Submit Date2020-10-23
Raw Data AvailableYes
Raw Data File Type(s).cdf
Analysis Type DetailGC-MS
Release Date2020-12-01
Release Version1
Steven Sollott Steven Sollott
https://dx.doi.org/10.21228/M8Z41B
ftp://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/Studies/ application/zip

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Project:

Project ID:PR001027
Project DOI:doi: 10.21228/M8Z41B
Project Title:Mitochondrial health is enhanced in rats with higher vs. lower intrinsic exercise capacity and extended lifespan
Project Type:Untargeted analysis of primary metabolism by GCTOF
Project Summary:The intrinsic aerobic capacity of an organism is thought to play a role in aging and longevity. Maximal respiratory rate capacity, a metabolic performance measure, is one of the best predictors of cardiovascular- and all-cause mortality. Rats selectively bred for high-(HCR) vs. low-(LCR) intrinsic running-endurance capacity have up to 31% longer lifespan. We found that positive changes in indices of mitochondrial health in cardiomyocytes (respiratory reserve, maximal respiratory capacity, resistance to mitochondrial permeability transition, autophagy/mitophagy, higher lipids-over-glucose utilization) are uniformly associated with the extended longevity in HCR vs. LCR female rats. Cross-sectional heart metabolomics revealed pathways from lipid metabolism in the heart which were significantly enriched by a select group of strain dependent metabolites, consistent with enhanced lipids utilization by HCR cardiomyocytes. Heart-liver-serum metabolomics further revealed shunting of lipidic substrates between liver and heart via serum during aging. Thus, mitochondrial health in cardiomyocytes is associated with extended longevity in rats with higher intrinsic exercise capacity, and likely these findings can be translated to other populations as predictors of outcomes of health and survival.
Institute:National Institute on Aging
Department:Cardioprotection Section
Laboratory:Laboratory of Cardiovascular Science
Last Name:Sollott
First Name:Steven
Address:Laboratory of Cardiovascular Science, National Institute on Aging, NIH, Baltimore, MD 21224, USA
Email:sollotts@grc.nia.nih.gov
Phone:410-558-8657
Funding Source:Intramural Research Program of the National Institutes of Health, National Institute on Aging.
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