Summary of Study ST001317

This data is available at the NIH Common Fund's National Metabolomics Data Repository (NMDR) website, the Metabolomics Workbench, https://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org, where it has been assigned Project ID PR000894. The data can be accessed directly via it's Project DOI: 10.21228/M84D6J This work is supported by NIH grant, U2C- DK119886.

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This study contains a large results data set and is not available in the mwTab file. It is only available for download via FTP as data file(s) here.

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Study IDST001317
Study TitleDynamics of Exposure, Phthalates, and Asthma in a Randomized Trial (DEPART)
Study TypeCHEAR Study
Study SummaryProject will investigate relationships between phthalate exposure, pediatric asthma health, and underlying biological pathways of toxicity among a rural, underserved Latino population located in Yakima Valley, WA. DEPART will benefit from the original study’s (HAPI’s) robust longitudinal repeat-measure design and community-engaged framework. DEPART will add new measurements including concentrations of urinary phthalate monoester metabolites and biomarkers of oxidative stress to better characterize exposure-response associations. This project’s primary goal is to deepen the understanding of pathophysiological phenomena underlying exposure-response relationships between phthalates and asthma health. Our specific aims are: (1) Characterize associations between urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations and short-term asthma morbidity, and (2) Determine individual relationships between urinary phthalate metabolite concentrations, short-term asthma morbidity, and biomarkers for oxidative stress to assess the potential for a mediating effect by oxidative stress. Covariates of interest will include atopic status, randomized intervention grouping, and the caregiver psychosocial stress assessment.
Institute
Icahn School of Medicine at Mount Sinai
DepartmentDepartment of Environmental Medicine and Public Health
LaboratoryMount Sinai CHEAR Untargeted Laboratory Hub
Last NameWalker
First NameDouglas
AddressAtran Building RM AB3-39, 1428 Madison Ave
Emaildouglas.walker@mssm.edu
Phone212-241-9891
Submit Date2020-02-05
Raw Data AvailableYes
Raw Data File Type(s)d
Chear StudyYes
Analysis Type DetailLC-MS
Release Date2021-08-31
Release Version1
Douglas Walker Douglas Walker
https://dx.doi.org/10.21228/M84D6J
ftp://www.metabolomicsworkbench.org/Studies/ application/zip

Select appropriate tab below to view additional metadata details:


Project:

Project ID:PR000894
Project DOI:doi: 10.21228/M84D6J
Project Title:Home Air in Agriculture Pediatric Intervention Trial (HAPI)
Project Summary:The HAPI study seeks to leverage a community-engaged research approach to reduce exposure to asthmagens in the homes of an environmental justice community of Latino children residing in an area of intense dairy and crop based agricultural production. These children with asthma experience high morbidity and our preliminary research finds significant effects of ambient concentrations of fine particulate matter and ammonia. Yet children spend the majority of their time indoors. Studies conducted in urban settings demonstrate that indoor particulate matter (PM) influences asthma outcomes and HEPA (high efficiency particulate air) cleaners can reduce indoor and ambient generated PM. Data on asthma in rural settings is sparse and trials incorporating HEPA portable air cleaners are lacking. This study seeks to characterize key indoor pollutant exposures for 80 children with asthma who reside within 400 meters of crop production or dairy operations. Prioritizing methods with low participant burden as well as innovative approaches, we will evaluate the effectiveness of the enhanced intervention on 1) Reducing indoor measures of PM and NH3 across seasons, 2. Improving clinically relevant measures of asthma health (Asthma Control Test, lung function, self-reported symptom days, oral steroid treatment, unscheduled clinical utilization), and 3. Reducing biomarkers of inflammation - urinary cysteine leukotriene (uLTE4) and exhaled nitric oxide (eNO). Caregiver psychosocial stress and behavioral components will be evaluated as mediators of these effects. The study design, procedures, translation of research results for multiple stakeholders and development of an environmental action plan to control/eliminate exposures are conducted within El Proyecto Bienestar, a longstanding UW-community research to action partnership. The project incorporates each of the NIEHS 2012-17 strategic themes and directly addresses 7 of the 11 sub goals.
Institute:University of Washington
Last Name:Karr
First Name:Catherine
Address:301, Roosevelt One Building, Seattle, WA
Email:ckarr@uw.edu
Phone:206-616-4355
Funding Source:National Institute of Environmental Health and Science (NIEHS), 5R01ES023510-03
Contributors:Sheela Sathyanarayana, Ryan Babadi, Robert Wright, Lauren Petrick, Douglas Walker, Manish Arora

Subject:

Subject ID:SU001391
Subject Type:Human
Subject Species:Homo sapiens
Taxonomy ID:9606

Factors:

Subject type: Human; Subject species: Homo sapiens (Factor headings shown in green)

mb_sample_id local_sample_id SampleType
SA094784C-1Q7R6-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
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SA094786C-1Q6M8-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
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SA094789C-1Q908-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094790C-1Q2M2-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094791C-1Q4K4-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094792C-1Q429-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094793C-1Q460-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094794C-1Q6C0-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094795C-1Q3N8-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
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SA094801C-1Q4P3-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094802C-1Q9C7-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094803C-1Q346-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094804C-1Q8F1-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094805C-1Q2P5-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094806C-1Q6G1-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094807C-1Q1Q4-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094808C-1Q536-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094809C-1Q1C5-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094810C-1Q254-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094811C-1QAK1-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094812C-1QA26-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094813C-1Q5C1-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094814C-1Q8E3-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094815C-1QAL9-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094816C-1Q3L3-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094817C-1Q247-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094818C-1Q7M7-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094819C-1Q395-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094820C-1Q2H3-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094821C-1QA67-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094822C-1Q5D8-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094823C-1Q3F6-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094824C-1Q494-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094825C-1Q528-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094826C-1Q650-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094827C-1Q3H2-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094828C-1QAB1-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094829C-1Q2X7-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094830C-1Q3Q2-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094831C-1Q6R7-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094832C-1Q8D5-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094833C-1Q3T5-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094834C-1Q2N9-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094835C-1Q825-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094836C-1Q4F5-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094837C-1Q7P0-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094838C-1Q445-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094839C-1Q8A2-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094840C-1Q4V0-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094841C-1Q5U1-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094842C-1Q5Y2-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094843C-1Q3V1-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094844C-1Q3A7-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094845C-1Q8J2-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094846C-1Q593-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094847C-1Q8M6-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094848C-1Q551-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094849C-1Q5E6-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094850C-1Q2J8-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094851C-1Q6K2-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094852C-1Q684-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094853C-1Q437-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094854C-1QA18-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094855C-1Q4H1-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094856C-1Q9L7-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094857C-1Q890-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094858C-1Q1U5-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094859C-1Q973-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094860C-1Q783-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094861C-1Q9P8-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094862C-1Q3Y4-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094863C-1Q7D6-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094864C-1Q3S7-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094865C-1Q8Q7-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094866C-1Q4G3-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094867C-1Q3B5-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094868C-1Q3U3-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094869C-1Q205-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094870C-1Q8R5-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094871C-1Q3M1-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094872C-1Q2R1-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094873C-1Q9W3-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094874C-1Q8G9-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094875C-1Q2K6-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094876C-1Q5G2-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094877C-1Q569-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094878C-1Q6A4-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094879C-1Q2F7-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094880C-1Q759-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094881C-1Q6V8-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094882C-1QAA3-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
SA094883C-1QA83-U-00CHEAR Study Sample
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Collection:

Collection ID:CO001386
Collection Summary:All study participants provide 4 individual urine samples corresponding to 4 unique time points: 2 pre intervention and 2 post-intervention samples. The first of these 4 urine samples are from an afternoon/evening clinic visit at baseline, and the remaining 3 urine samples are first morning voids. All materials for urine sample collection are phthalate-free. All have been stored in a -20 freezer in the field, then transfered on dry ice to UW -20 freezer equipped with temperature alarms. Samples have not yet been thawed.
Sample Type:Urine
Storage Conditions:-20℃

Treatment:

Treatment ID:TR001406
Treatment Summary:HAPI is a randomized controlled trial with subject recruitment utilizing an existing community health worker delivered asthma education program operated by the region's federally qualified health center. HAPI eligibility criteria includes: (i) age 6 – 12 years, (ii) asthma not well controlled, (iii) no household smokers, and (iv) residence within 400m of dairy/crop production. Recruited subjects are randomized to a standard educational program or an enhanced intervention, which includes 2 portable room HEPA cleaners – one in the child sleeping area and one in the living room – with PM and ammonia (NH3) reduction filters. Enrollment occurs on a rolling basis, and each subject undergoes an initial baseline clinic visit and three additional health assessment in-home visits – the first and last of which occurring alongside environmental sampling. Subjects are randomized after the first home visit. Subjects in the control (standard asthma education only) group will receive HEPA cleaners at the end of their study year, if requested. The study setting is Yakima County, WA.

Sample Preparation:

Sampleprep ID:SP001399
Sampleprep Summary:Urine samples were thawed on ice, vortexed, and specific gravity (SpG) was measured. Samples were diluted with LC-MS grade water to the lowest measured SpG with ultrapure water (HILIC-positive only). Aliquots of 20 μL of the diluted urine were prepared for analysis with the LC-HRMS. A third 20 μL aliquot from each sample was combined for use as a pooled quality control sample (‘LQC’). When aliquoting was complete, the LQC sample was re-aliquoted into 20μL samples. All aliquots were returned to -80°C until analysis. Extraction was performed immediately prior to LC-HRMS analysis. All sample aliquots were thawed on ice, combined with 180uL of acetonitrile containing internal standards. Samples were then centrifuged and 80μL of supernatant transferred to an LC vial for analysis. Following the same protocol matrix blank (replacing the urine with H2O) and multiple LQCs were extracted.
Processing Storage Conditions:On ice

Combined analysis:

Analysis ID AN002192 AN002193
Analysis type MS MS
Chromatography type HILIC Reversed phase
Chromatography system Agilent 1290 Infinity II Agilent 1290 Infinity II
Column SeQuant ZIC-HILIC column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 100 Å, 3.5 µm particle size, Merck, Darmstadt, Germany) Agilent Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18, RRHD column (50 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.8 µm particle size)
MS Type ESI ESI
MS instrument type QTOF QTOF
MS instrument name Agilent 6550 QTOF Agilent 6550 QTOF
Ion Mode POSITIVE NEGATIVE
Units Peak Intensity Peak Intensity

Chromatography:

Chromatography ID:CH001607
Chromatography Summary:Sample extracts were analyzed using an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) 1290 Infinity II system (including 0.3 µm inline filter, Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, USA) with 1260 Infinity II isocratic pump (including 1:100 splitter) coupled to a 6550 iFunnel quadrupole-time time of flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer with a dual AJS electrospray ionization source (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, USA). Samples were maintained at 5C in the autosampler module. For polar metabolites separation, 2 uL of sample was injected onto a HILIC SeQuant® ZIC®-HILIC column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 100 Å, 3.5 µm particle size, Merck, Darmstadt, Germany) with a guard fitting (14 mm × 1 mm, 5.0 µm particle size, Merck, Darmstadt, Germany) maintained at 25C. Separation occurred using Mobile phase A consisted of water with 0.1% formic acid and Mobile phase B consisted of Acetonitrile with 0.1% formic acid at a flow rate of 0.3 ml/min as described in Table 1. Data was acquired with a mass range of 40-1200 m/z. Solvent gradients were as follows: 95% solvent B, hold for 1.5 min; linear decrease to 40% solvent B at 12 minutes; hold for 2 min, linear decrease to 25% solvent B at 14.2 min, hold for 2.8 min; increase to 95% solvent B at 18 min, hold for 7 min.
Instrument Name:Agilent 1290 Infinity II
Column Name:SeQuant ZIC-HILIC column (100 mm × 2.1 mm, 100 Å, 3.5 µm particle size, Merck, Darmstadt, Germany)
Column Temperature:25C
Flow Rate:0.3 mL/min
Solvent A:Water with 0.1% formic acid
Solvent B:Acetonitrile with 0.1% formic acid
Analytical Time:25 min
Chromatography Type:HILIC
  
Chromatography ID:CH001608
Chromatography Summary:Sample extracts were analyzed using an ultra-high performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) 1290 Infinity II system (including 0.3 µm inline filter, Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, USA) with 1260 Infinity II isocratic pump (including 1:100 splitter) coupled to a 6550 iFunnel quadrupole-time time of flight (Q-TOF) mass spectrometer with a dual AJS electrospray ionization source (Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, USA). Samples were maintained at 5C in the autosampler module. For nonpolar metabolites separation, 2 uL of sample sandwiched between 10 uL of water was injected onto a Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18, RRHD column (50 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.8 µm particle size, Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, USA) coupled to a guard column (5 mm × 2 mm, 1.8 µm Agilent Technologies, Santa Clara, USA) maintained at 50C. Separation occurred using Mobile phase A consisted of water with 0.1% formic acid and Mobile phase B consisted of 2-propanol:ACN (90:10, v/v) with 0.1% formic acid at a flow rate of 0.4 ml/min as described in Table 2. Data was acquired with a mass range of 50-1200 m/z. Solvent gradients were as follows: 5% solvent B; linear increase to 98% solvent B at 13.5 min, hold for 1.5 min; decrease to 5% solvent B at 15.5 min, hold for 3.5 min.
Instrument Name:Agilent 1290 Infinity II
Column Name:Agilent Zorbax Eclipse Plus C18, RRHD column (50 mm × 2.1 mm, 1.8 µm particle size)
Column Temperature:50C
Flow Rate:0.4 mL/min
Solvent A:Water with 0.1% formic acid
Solvent B:2-propanol:ACN (90:10, v/v) with 0.1% formic acid
Analytical Time:19 min
Chromatography Type:Reversed phase

MS:

MS ID:MS002039
Analysis ID:AN002192
Instrument Name:Agilent 6550 QTOF
Instrument Type:QTOF
MS Type:ESI
MS Comments:Analysis was performed for all batches (6) in each mode. Database dependent targeted identification: Metabolites were identified based upon in-house database matching considering retention time, accurate mass, and MSMS matching (when available) matching with pure standards analyzed under the same conditions. Untargeted metabolomics analysis: Parameters for peak picking grouping, and alignment with ‘XCMS’ included centwave feature detection, orbiwarp retention time correction, minimum fraction of samples in one group to be a valid group = 0.25, isotopic ppm error = 10. Width of overlapping m/z slices (mzwid) = 0.003 or 0.015, and retention time window (bw) = 12.4 s and 22 s for ZHP and RPN, respectively. Minimum and maximum peak width were 5 and 20 s for reverse phase and 10 and 60 s for HILIC. The resulting peak table of retention times, m/z values, and peak areas was exported for data processing. Annotation of the untargeted data was facilitated by xMSannotator using the annotation scheme of Schymanski et al. (Environmental Science & Technology, 2014). Level 1 and 2 annotations were those that were confirmed with database dependent annotation. Lower confidence annotations (level 4) are those from the HMDB and T3DB online databases that were highly ranking by xMSannotator. Level 5 annotations were named by “mz_rt”. Metadata for the analysis including the batch and run order of each injection are provided. We also included the Specific gravity measurements and dilution factor performed for each sample prior to data acquisition.
Ion Mode:POSITIVE
Capillary Temperature:250C
Capillary Voltage:3000
  
MS ID:MS002040
Analysis ID:AN002193
Instrument Name:Agilent 6550 QTOF
Instrument Type:QTOF
MS Type:ESI
MS Comments:Analysis was performed for all batches (6) in each mode. Database dependent targeted identification: Metabolites were identified based upon in-house database matching considering retention time, accurate mass, and MSMS matching (when available) matching with pure standards analyzed under the same conditions. Untargeted metabolomics analysis: Parameters for peak picking grouping, and alignment with ‘XCMS’ included centwave feature detection, orbiwarp retention time correction, minimum fraction of samples in one group to be a valid group = 0.25, isotopic ppm error = 10. Width of overlapping m/z slices (mzwid) = 0.003 or 0.015, and retention time window (bw) = 12.4 s and 22 s for ZHP and RPN, respectively. Minimum and maximum peak width were 5 and 20 s for reverse phase and 10 and 60 s for HILIC. The resulting peak table of retention times, m/z values, and peak areas was exported for data processing. Annotation of the untargeted data was facilitated by xMSannotator using the annotation scheme of Schymanski et al. (Environmental Science & Technology, 2014). Level 1 and 2 annotations were those that were confirmed with database dependent annotation. Lower confidence annotations (level 4) are those from the HMDB and T3DB online databases that were highly ranking by xMSannotator. Level 5 annotations were named by “mz_rt”. Metadata for the analysis including the batch and run order of each injection are provided. We also included the Specific gravity measurements and dilution factor performed for each sample prior to data acquisition.
Ion Mode:NEGATIVE
Capillary Temperature:250C
Capillary Voltage:-3000
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